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CIVIL REGISTRATION AND VITAL STATISTICS

IN ASIA AND THE PACIFIC

  • Resources for civil registration during the COVID-19 pandemic

    The current pandemic is disrupting CRVS systems all over the world, but well-functioning systems are more essential than ever. As a result, the UN Statistics Division, the World Health Organization and the UN Legal Identity Agenda Task Force have developed resources offering guidance for civil registration stakeholders on maintaining CRVS activities.

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  • Postponement of the Second Ministerial Conference on CRVS in Asia and the Pacific

    The Second Ministerial Conference on CRVS has been postponed to 2021. The uncertainty of the current situation made it unfit to properly prepare for this event, meant to celebrate progress midway through the CRVS Decade (2015-2024), identify remaining challenges, emphasize the role CRVS plays in sustainable development and promote CRVS as the foundation for legal identity. 

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  • Midterm CRVS Decade (2015-2024) Progress

    ESCAP is collecting country midterm questionnaires to measure regional progress through the midpoint of the CRVS Decade (2015-2024). Responses will inform and guide preparations for the Second Ministerial Conference in October 2020.

    What are the numbers so far?

    • 41 midterm questionnaires collected
    • 53 national focal points established

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Postponement of the Second Ministerial Conference on CRVS in Asia and the Pacific

In light of the current global situation, the celebration of the midpoint of the CRVS Decade (2015-2024) has been postponed. The ongoing crisis indeed impedes the safe organization of such an event, and sheds a new light on the needs for CRVS systems which might feed into the discussions on the remaining challenges in the region. In the build up to the Conference, additional information and resources can be accessed here.

 

Cause of death on the death certificate in line with ICD-10, Quick reference guide

The section on the cause of death on the death certificate is identical worldwide. It has two parts - called Part I and Part II, and a section to record the time interval between the onset of each condition and the date of death. 
Part I - is used for diseases or conditions that form part of the sequence of events leading directly to death. 
Part II - is used for conditions which have no direct connection with the events leading to death but whose presence contributed to death.

Birth Certificate Content Review

The New South Wales Registry of Births Deaths and Marriages (“the Registry”) is reviewing the content of birth certificates in Australia. This review is being undertaken for the following reasons: To examine changes in how birth certificates are used; in consideration of how birth certificates can best reflect the changing composition of families in Australia; and in response to recommendations of the Senate Community Affairs Committee inquiry into the Commonwealth’s role in former adoption policies and practices.

Assessing the reliability of hospital-based cause-of-death statistics evidence-based guidelines for country application

The objective of this study is to synthesise the findings from a large number of studies that have used medical record reviews to validate the COD reported on the death certificate or through the vital registration system. Based on an analysis of a core set of these studies, we developed a methodological framework for medical record reviews for countries to follow for routinely validating their CODs.

Advocating for civil registration: guide to developing a business case for civil registration systems

This working paper provides practical information on the preparation and use of a business case in support of a civil registration system. The paper outlines a six-step approach to building the business case and comprises – assessing the current system; conducting research and formulating the arguments; identifying, analysing and engaging with stakeholders; and, presenting the case to the relevant decision-makers. The paper describes ideas for mobilising support for implementing civil registration systems. It includes a cost–benefit analysis to help decision-makers understand the short-term and long-term costs, benefits and impacts of a registration system.

What is CRVS?

Civil registration and vital statistics (CRVS) is the continuous, permanent, compulsory and universal recording of the occurrence and characteristics of vital events of the population in accordance with the law. The actors in a CRVS system typically include the civil registration authorities, Ministry of Interior or Home Affairs, Ministry of Justice, Ministry of Health, National Statistics Office and development partners.

Asia Pacific Population Journal

In this series of articles, the role of universal civil registration and vital statistics (CRVS) systems is examined as an essential tool for good governance and inclusive development.  In the first article in the series, the case is made for investing in CRVS systems; the current situation in countries in the region is described, and the emergence and development of regional collaboration on CRVS is summarized.  In the second article, the actions taken in specific countries to strengthen their CRVS systems are highlighted, and the lessons learned are described, with several innovative approaches being showcased. The third article contains a description of the relationships between CRVS systems (civil registration and population databases in particular), legal identity, the realization of human rights and access to basic social protection, using country examples from the Asia-Pacific region for these purposes.  In the fourth and final article, the importance of building a sound evidence base for efforts to improve CRVS is highlighted, and a framework for prioritizing research activities is proposed. 

Events

News

Resources

Advocacy Materials, Meeting Documents, UN Official Documents, 2015
Newsletters, 2020
Country Assessments and Strategies, 2020